What Fruits and Vegetables Looked Like Before They Were Grown By Humans

by Organic And Healthy

Fruits and Vegetables look dramatically different in the wild before humans started cultivating and growing them.

 

It may seem a bit unreal but the fruits and vegetables we eat on a daily basis didn’t always look exactly the way they do. Nowadays GMO’s (genetically modified organisms) have ran rapid in the food industry and especially the produce that’s sold in almost every commercial food market. 

Genetically modifying organisms involves splicing the genes from other organisms to give plants a desired look and/or taste. GMO’s haven’t been around for a longtime but humans have been modifying and tweaking the genetics of the foods we eat for a millennium.

Wild Watermelon-

 

This is a painting from the 17th century by the artist Giovanni Stanchi. It depicts what looks like an unfamiliar watermelon. It is split into 6 different sections almost in a pie form.

 

Modern Watermelon-

 

Humans have bred watermelons to have a full andfleshy inside. This is called the placenta. Some argue the watermelon in the painting wasn’t ripe or could have been poorly watered. The black seeds in the painting however suggest otherwise.

Modern Banana-  

Comparing the modern banana to it’s ancestor; it is easier to peel, has minuscule unnoticeable seeds, and tastes much better. Not to mention bigger and easier to handle.

Wild Eggplant-  

The earliest eggplants are believed to have cultivated in parts of China. Primitive versions were also believed to have spines where the stem’s connected to the flowers.

Wild Eggplants are also known togrow and hold many different colors.

 

Modern Eggplant-  

Nowadays through breeding and altering it’s DNA. We get the “Big Purple Vegetable.”

Wild Carrots- 

Believed to have originated in the 10th century and located in Persia and Asia Minor, Carrots were thought to be purple or white with thin forked roots. Overtime they lost their original color and adapted a yellowish tint.

Modern Carrot- 

Farmers took advantage of the carrot and over years turned them into the big tasty orange vegetable we have today.

Wild Corn- 

Perhaps the most iconic example of modification of vegetables is Corn. Natural cornis also believed to have been first domesticated around 7,000 B.C and was actually dry. It was barely edible and had derived from the teosinte plant.

Modern Corn- 

Around the 15th century corn started to change rapidly. Nowadays corn has 6.6 percent of sugar compared to it’s ancestor with only 1.9 percent. It’s also much larger and better to eat.

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Source:  Organic And Healthy

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